Why You Should Definitely Reconsider a Holiday Wedding

holiday wedding

Photo by Heather Mayer Photography

As we enter the thick of the holiday season, your mind is probably on turkey and sleigh bells, not weddings. But the holidays can occasionally hold a wedding or two!

A lot of people have strong opinions on holiday weddings. It’s either love ‘em (such a fun way to spend a holiday weekend!) or hate ‘em (expensive travel and a long weekend spent at a fancy event instead of at home in jammies). But if you’re thinking about a holiday wedding, there are definitely some solid perks. If you’ve never considered having your wedding over Memorial Day, the Fourth of July, Thanksgiving, New Year’s, or a different holiday, weigh these pros and cons before making a decision.

Pros:

  • Availability. There’s not usually a ton of demand for holiday weekends. That means snagging your dream venue, photographer, and DJ might be possible!
  • Lower costs. Since it’s harder for venues and vendors to book weddings during holiday weekends, they can occasionally offer significant price cuts.
  • Special memory for years to come. If you get married on New Year’s Eve, the day will always hold an extra special significance for you and your groom. It won’t just be a fun holiday—it’ll be your anniversary!
  • Endless theme ideas. Having a Fourth of July wedding? Fireworks! Red, white and blue centerpieces! American flag favors! Having a holiday wedding is like having a built-in theme that’s easy to celebrate, as long as you don’t go over-the-top with the clichés. The great part about a holiday wedding theme is that it helps your guests celebrate the holiday, too—not just your wedding!
  • Extra vacation time. Having your wedding over a holiday weekend means the possibility of an extra day or two off to prepare! For instance, if you get married the Saturday of Thanksgiving weekend, you’ll have Thursday and Friday off to do any last minute tasks without having to take vacation days from work. Or if you get married near Christmas, you may have a few extra days for your honeymoon.

Cons:

  • A smaller guest list. If you’re having your wedding over a holiday weekend, it’s probably wise to expect that fewer guests will be able to make it. People have their own traditions and vacations planned for those precious long weekends. Your guests may prefer not to spend their holiday weekend traveling.
  • Higher travel costs. If you have a lot of guests coming in from out of town, the cost of flights will be much higher on a holiday weekend, or there may be a lot of traffic. Also, if you’re planning on immediately jetting off on your honeymoon, that will be something to consider as well.
  • Lack of accommodations. Again, if you’re having a lot of family and friends come in from out of town, hotels will book early and be expensive.
  • Expensive florals. Flowers are going to cost quite a bit more during the winter months; in particular, a Valentine’s Day wedding will run your floral bill high. If you’re planning on having tons of dreamy floral centerpieces, a holiday wedding may be tough on your wallet.
  • Financial strain on your guests. In addition to high travel and hotel costs, holidays can often be financially stressful times in general. If you’re having a New Year’s Eve wedding, remember that your guests probably just spent a great deal of money on Christmas or Hanukkah presents and events. Don’t be surprised if your gifts are on the less extravagant side, and try not to put too much pressure on a black-tie event!

The Final Decision

Before you take the plunge, think about which holiday means a lot to you and your groom, and then get some price quotes and availability information from your venue and vendors. Then, think about your dream wedding—do you have a lot of family across the country? Are most of your friends local? Were you planning on having a huge, elegant affair at a mansion, or more of a backyard BBQ soiree? All of these factors will play into whether or not you decide to go for a holiday weekend.

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